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Winter Warmer – Nutty Turnip Soup


Inspired by traditional Scottish, and Zimbabwean everyday cooking, this soup blends the flavours of turnip (orange swede) with crunchy peanut butter (dovi). For a more authentic African flavour, substitute pumpkin or butternut squash for the turnip. Served very hot, thick and roughly mashed for texture and crunch. This is a tasty and filling dish – perfect for cold winter days.

1 medium turnip (or pumpkin, or butternut squash) cubed

1 bunch fresh celery, finely chopped

1 quarter small white cabbage, finely chopped

1 handful of golden lentils

1 chunk (about 3cm square) of fresh stem ginger, finely chopped

Fresh herbs to taste (coriander or basil work well)

Optional – enough stock (minimise the salt), or water to make it soupy but thick

3 large tablespoons of unsweetened crunchy peanut butter

Lots of roughly ground black pepper

Sweat the vegetables and ginger in a large heavy based pot until starting to soften. Add water or stock depending on your taste (vegetables have a naturally sweet taste which changes when you add salt or salty stock). Cook gently until the turnip is cooked but is still slightly firm then add the lentils. Cook for around 20 minutes more until the lentils are soft then mash roughly with a potato masher. Stir in the peanut butter, heat through then stir in the chopped fresh herbs. Add black pepper to taste. Serve with a swirl of fresh unsweetened cream.


Filed under: Food

About the Author

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Feeling boxed in by the rigour and structure required in my career as a research and teaching academic, I now want to follow flights of fancy and try my hand at creative writing and social media. This could be challenging so comments and advice from seasoned bloggers are most welcome!

2 Comments

  1. peeversandpenguins

    Love to hear how yours turns out. I am not one for recipes. I just through in a handful of this and a hanful of that until it looks and smells right. Sometimes it results in a lovely surpise, and sometimes not!

    Like

  2. Being a slave to the Navez (turnip) which is treated with proper respect by the French, and loving all the other good things you have put in your soup leads me to the sure knowledge that I will be trying it … I will report back when done on the results – I just hope they are as good as yours looks 🙂

    Like

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